Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Free Crochet Pattern...One Round Cloud



Here is a little cloud you can crochet in just a few minutes.  Using fluffy pillow-like baby yarn, the result is a soft and squishy cloud that you can use as an applique or other decoration.  

One Round Cloud
By Jennifer Dickerson




Materials:

  • J (6.0 mm) hook (the hook on the yarn label called for a "K" hook, but I went down a hook size to make mine extra squishy)
  • White yarn (yarn used for the cloud shown is called "Baby's First" by Lion Brand in the "Pixie Dust" colorway)
  • Tapestry needle for weaving in ends


Sizing:

  • The cloud is about 2 inches wide (5 cm). However, feel free to experiment with different hooks and yarn to make a variety of different clouds...perhaps an entire sky of them is in order!





Instructions:

Foundation: Chain 6 and join with a slip stitch to form a ring.

Round 1: 
(I wrote round 1 written in column format to make it easier to follow along)

All stitches worked into center of ring:
2 dc,
sl st,
1 dc,
2 tr,
1 dc,
sl st,
2 dc,
sl st,
1 dc,
2 tr,
1 dc,
sl st,
3 dc

...join with a slip stitch to close your cloud and fasten off.

Finishing:
Weave in ends and you're all finished! Shape a bit with your hands if needed.




© Jennifer Dickerson 2013
Please note: Patterns are for personal and charity use only. In addition, if you enjoy the pattern, please link to it, but do not copy the pattern to your own website or blog (including other languages). Thank you!

Here's a video on how to crochet the cloud stitch by stitch:



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Friday, April 26, 2013

CAL: Show it off!

Good morning and a very happy Friday to you!

I have been looking forward to this all week...our CAL gallery!  Yippee!  I received some lovely pictures from several of you and here they are!

Check out Pam's beautiful ruby red cowl:



And how about Tawana's blue cowl...I love that Robin's egg blue color don't you?



And Kathy's cowl in a gorgeous tangerine!  She even added some pretty beads to hers...awesome!

 


Carrie made hers in white, looks like a fabulous and cozy cloud!  She blogged about it here.

Robin used a lovely seafoam color...so pretty and springy!


Oh, and here are my two...the first one I made in green when I wrote the pattern and the orchid one is from the tutorials...I'm really happy with how they turned out!


Thanks to all of you who participated and thanks to those too who were willing to share their pictures, I hope all you have had as much fun crocheting together as I have.  Have a very happy weekend folks!

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Free Crochet Pattern...Layered Ruffle Flower


This beautiful blossom adds a little springy cheer anywhere you place it.  Put a pin on the back and wear it as a brooch (as shown) or sew it to a purse or garment.

Crocheted quickly in two layers and sewn together, the color possibilities are endless.  Top it off with a special button and add some optional leaves if you like.



Layered Ruffle Flower
By Jennifer Dickerson

Materials:


  • I (5.5 mm) Crochet Hook
  • Worsted weight yarn in 2 colors of your choice
  • Button
  • Tapestry Needle (for weaving in ends)



Instructions:

Bottom Layer (shown in purple):
Foundation: Chain 6 and join with a slip stitch to form a ring.
Round 1: Work 12 double crochet into center of ring then join with a slip stitch.
Round 2: Chain 3 and work 6 double crochet in each space around the entire edge to give it its ruffled appearance. Join with a slip stitch and fasten off.

Top Layer (shown in pink):
Foundation: Chain 6 and join with a slip stitch to form a ring.
Round 1: Work 12 double crochet into center of ring then join with a slip stitch.
Round 2: Chain 2 and work 6 single crochet in each space around the entire edge to give it its ruffled appearance. Join with a slip stitch and fasten off.

Finishing:

Weave in all ends. Stack the bottom layer, then the top layer, and the button on top of them both and sew all three together. Add leaves if desired by stitching them to the back.
Click here for leaf pattern!




© Jennifer Dickerson 2013
Please note: Patterns are for personal and charity use only.
If you enjoy the pattern, please link to it, but do not copy the pattern to your own website or blog.

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Monday, April 22, 2013

Happy Earth Day!


Happy Earth Day to you!  On this lovely day, I'm here rummaging through my yarn and enjoying the sunshine streaming in through my windows.  In the spirit of reducing waste, I've gathered lots of fun things you can do with your yarn scraps, that will yield some beautiful little projects.

I have to admit I'm somewhat of a pack rat when it comes to my yarn, not only do I tend to hoard it, but I never throw away yarn when I'm finished a project...ever!  If I have enough left from my skein, I'll make something else from it.  If I have just a few inches, the teeny tiny pieces will go in a bag and be used for later like the photo below, and are perfect for stuffing toys, pillows, etc:



Here are some knitting and crochet patterns that use just a bit of yarn too, so that all of your scraps will be have a pretty use (just click on the link for the pattern):



Classic Granny Squares (Crochet)


Baby Doll Hats (Knitting)


Kitchen Lovelies (Crochet)


Play Kitchen Pot Holders (Knitting)


Modern Circles Garland (Crochet)


Tiny One Round Hearts (Crochet)


Fabulous Fish Dishcloth (Crochet)


Luggage Blossoms (Knitting)


Granny Berry Dishcloths (Crochet)


One Round Leaf (Crochet)


One Round Flowers (Crochet)


Little Raindrops (Crochet)

Friday, April 19, 2013

CAL: Finish work and how to Weave in Ends


It's Friday, it's Friday!  Time to get back to our CAL, I hope you are having as much fun as I am.  We have reached the last day of crocheting our cowls together...my how time flies.  Next week I will be creating a gallery post on Friday to share with you all of the beautiful photos that have been coming in...so pretty!  Please be sure to send us a photo of yours too when you are finished if you haven't already:
Today we'll be sharing some ideas on finishing your piece.  Often (I am totally guilty of this), we'll finish crocheting (or knitting), tie it off and it feels complete.  However, there are still a few little things to make it look its best.  It is important to take the needed time on this step, because it really makes a huge difference when taking just a bit of time to make the ends and seams nice and neat.


If you desire, you can block your project.  If you used a synthetic yarn such as acrylic, it probably won't make much of a difference but a natural fiber like wool for example, it might benefit from a little straightening out.  However, the stitches we used for this cowl lay nice and flat, but it is totally up to you.  Click here for a photo tutorial on how to block your work.



Here's a little tip too...no need for expensive blocking mats, click here and use these instead.

Now it's time to seam the cowl and weave in in the ends.  You can do these steps in any order you want, it's up to you.  To weave in the ends, begin with your tail and a tapestry needle,



Now run the needle through a few of the stitches along the bottom edge.  Be sure to flip it over during this step and peek to be sure it is uniformly being woven on the other side too.  Pull the needle all the way through.


Next, run the needle back the other way through the stitches...and pull the needle all the way through.



Snip the remaining yarn (I like to give it a very slight and gentle tug first),



See that little end peeking out below?  Give it another (very) gentle tug in both directions and it will disappear.



Perfect!!



And for the seaming part...



Because the cowl is crocheted flat, we'll have to seam up the cowl.  Again, you can do this step prior to weaving in the other ends if you like.  You can do this one of two ways:

You could crochet the two pieces together using the slip stitch.  Or you can sew them together using the whip stitch.  Click here to learn how to whip stitch your project step by step.

Once you're finished, you'll have to weave in those ends too...sometimes I like to save all of the weaving for last.  All finished!  Now throw it around your neck and go show it off!

Please share your beautiful work:

Click here too for a step by step video for weaving in ends:


Have a lovely weekend, stitchers!

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Free Crochet Pattern...Ocean Air Scarf


The Ocean Air Scarf is a medium to lighter weight scarf that celebrates the soothing sounds and gentle breezes of the sea.

Inspired by the Arugula Scarf pattern, this scarf is quick to work up lengthwise and finished with a lovely scallop edging, reminiscent of ocean waves.


Ocean Air Scarf
By Jennifer Dickerson

Materials:
  • J (6.0 mm) Crochet Hook
  • 1.2 Skeins Wool of the Andes Tweeds (worsted weight, "Thirst Heather" colorway 
  • Tapestry Needle (for weaving in ends)

Sizing: 
  • Width: 3 inches at the widest part of scallop
  • Length: 60 inches

Instructions:

Ch 156
Foundation Row: In the 4th chain from the hook, work a dc, then work one dc in each ch to the end of the row.

Row 1: Turn, ch 3 and work 1 dc in the first stitch and in each stitch to the end of row.
Repeat this row two more times.

Scallop Row: Turn, ch 3 and work 4 dc into the first st. In the next st, work a slip stitch.  Skip the next st.  In the next st work 5 dc, slip stitch in the next st, skip the next st.  Continue working this sequence (5 dc, sl st in next st, skip next st) until reaching the end of the row, ending on a scallop (5 dc).  Work one more sl st in that same stitch that you worked the 5 dc to finish off the last scallop.  This will round it off and make it look more finished.


Finishing:
Weave in all ends.  Block if needed.


© Jennifer Dickerson 2013
Please note: Patterns are for personal and charity use only.
If you enjoy the pattern, please link to it, but do not copy the pattern to your own website or blog.  Thank you!

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