Wednesday, January 20, 2021

Finger Crochet Pom Scarf, Free Crochet Pattern + Video


The Finger Crochet Pom Scarf is an easy little project that you can easily make in an evening.  Cuddly blanket yarn makes this scarf extra cozy and comfy. Two fun pom poms at either end will brighten up even the grayest winter days too!

Want a little help? There's a full video tutorial below too! 

Finger Crochet Pom Scarf
By Jennifer Dickerson

Click the button below to add this to your Ravelry queue:


Click below to watch a full video tutorial on how to make this project:



Materials:
  • 1 ball Bernat Blanket, 220 yards, I used the "Pale Gray" colorway, any super bulky "6" or jumbo "7" will work great.
  • Worsted weight acrylic yarn for the pom pom, I used Super Saver in "Grenadine"
  • Tapestry needle 
  • Scissors (larger is best for this project)
  • Tape measure

Finished Sizing:
  • 4.5 inches wide
  • 64 inches long
  • Pompoms are each 3 inches tall, adding 6 inches total length to the scarf.


Instructions:

Note: if you don't want to finger crochet, you can always use a large hook.

Ch 6 (for a wider scarf, just make your starting chain longer if needed)

Row 1: In the 2nd chain from your finer (or hook), work a sc.  Work a sc in each ch across.

Row 2: Ch 1 and turn.  Work a sc into the first stitch and in each stitch across.

Repeat rows 2 until piece measures approximately 64 inches long or desired length.

Weave in ends.  To give the ends a tapered look at either end, weave tail through the bottom edge and pull tight.  Knot to hold in place.  This will give the scarf a tapered look at either ends which looks nicer with the pom poms.

Assembly and Finishing:

To make a pompom, cut a piece of yarn about 12-18 inches long.  Wrap yarn about 150 times around your hand.  Tie tightly in the center of the "bundle" and cut all loops, keeping the two ends long (to attach to hat later).  Trim ends to give your pom pom a "hair cut" until the pompom is more compact and neat looking.  

Tie each pom pom at either end of scarf and weave in all ends that remain. 



© Jennifer Dickerson 2021

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